A Sense of Tradition

A SENSE OF TRADITION

Although you would never know it from our accommodation, Kims has been around for a long time. Since 1886 in fact, which means we have had plenty of time to make our mark. It shows in all sorts of ways, from the avenue of giant Norfolk island pines that were planted when Kims was just a collection of tents to the Strawberry and Cream Pavlova that has been a feature of our Saturday evening dinner buffet since 1937.

As the Kims’ experience unfolds during your stay, you’ll probably notice some of the traditions that have been laid down during our long history. Some are obvious, but some are a little more subtle.

Our dining room bell has rung three times a day for more than a century. The custom dates back to the time when men wore pocket watches, which they would not risk on the sand, and the tradition of using a brass bell to signal the hour would have come naturally to Captain Frans Charlson, who established Kims.

The mast set into the gardens in front of the dining room is a reminder of Kims’ long connection with the sea. The mast comes from a yacht, ‘Satin Sheets’, that belonged to owner Andrew Strachan. On a voyage back from Hawaii, the mast broke and Andrew lashed it to the side and ferried it home – and planted it in its present position. Along with Australia’s own flag, you’ll find the national flags of our in-house guests, as well as special ensigns in honour of national days – the Cross of Saint Andrews flag on Burns Night, or the French Tricolour on Bastille Day.

You might also notice the curious line of narrow gauge railway tracks, initially used to transport coal for Kims’ boilers and Arga stoves, now the porter for guests’ luggage.

A lot of our guests have been before, and they appreciate the sense of tradition that Kims represents. While we are friendly, we are not familiar. A celebration of some of the finer things life has to offer, and it is only natural that the atmosphere is convivial.

A SENSE OF TRADITION

Although you would never know it from our accommodation, Kims has been around for a long time. Since 1886 in fact, which means we have had plenty of time to make our mark. It shows in all sorts of ways, from the avenue of giant Norfolk island pines that were planted when Kims was just a collection of tents to the Strawberry and Cream Pavlova that has been a feature of our Saturday evening dinner buffet since 1937.

As the Kims’ experience unfolds during your stay, you’ll probably notice some of the traditions that have been laid down during our long history. Some are obvious, but some are a little more subtle.

Our dining room bell has rung three times a day for more than a century. The custom dates back to the time when men wore pocket watches, which they would not risk on the sand, and the tradition of using a brass bell to signal the hour would have come naturally to Captain Frans Charlson, who established Kims.

The mast set into the gardens in front of the dining room is a reminder of Kims’ long connection with the sea. The mast comes from a yacht, ‘Satin Sheets’, that belonged to owner Andrew Strachan. On a voyage back from Hawaii, the mast broke and Andrew lashed it to the side and ferried it home – and planted it in its present position. Along with Australia’s own flag, you’ll find the national flags of our in-house guests, as well as special ensigns in honour of national days – the Cross of Saint Andrews flag on Burns Night, or the French Tricolour on Bastille Day.

You might also notice the curious line of narrow gauge railway tracks, initially used to transport coal for Kims’ boilers and Arga stoves, now the porter for guests’ luggage.

A lot of our guests have been before, and they appreciate the sense of tradition that Kims represents. While we are friendly, we are not familiar. A celebration of some of the finer things life has to offer, and it is only natural that the atmosphere is convivial.

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